General

Which was the First Francophone Radio Network in North America?   


Anonymous
Posted 31 Aug. 2019



WebsCare Inc
@webscare | Posted 31 Aug. 2019


CKAC Radio Circulation 730 AM is known to be a commercial radio network which is located in Montreal, Quebec. It is famous for its brand name i.e., Radio Circulation 730. Its call-letters, which are CKAC, reflects the meaning Canadien-Kilocycle-Amerique-Canada. The radio lays in Class A category, and it covers the whole region of North America in its broadcasting range. The channel also telecast traffic information so the public can be aware of all traffic conditions in the area. It airs its transmission in all across the globe by using the French Language. This broadcasting radio is owned by a media company known as Cogeco (591991 B.C. Ltd.).


The studio of CKAC FM is situated at Place Bonaventure in Downtown Montreal. However, its transmitter is placed in Saint Joseph du Lace; it runs on AM band and operates on 730 kHz frequency. It got a license to use a power of fifty thousand watts. CKBE-FM, CFGL-FM, CHMP-FM, and CKOI-FM are the sibling channels of the radio.

The catchphrase of the radio service is La circulation, en tout temps. It means Traffic, all the time in English. Its motto reflects the vision of the channel. The primary image of this radio is to keep its public updated about all traffic information. CKAC Radio Circulation 730 AM Online Streaming is available here. 


The CKAC station was established on 27 Sep 1992 by its owner. And it officially launched its first broadcast on 2 Oct 1922. It used to be owned by La Presse (a local newspaper) in its early days. It was also the very first francophone radio service in entire North America.

The well-known and famous presenters of the radio who are serving it for so many years are as follows: Gabriel Gregoire and Michel Langevin used to telecast morning shows of the network which basically warm up the listeners. Then mid-morning shows were conducted by Mario Langlois. The early afternoon was aired by Jean-Charles Lajoie.

 




  Topics